Smoked Turkey / Best Beef Jerky / other Smoking Recipes

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  • The_Z_Man wrote:gonna smoke this year's thanksgiving turkey.


    You're gonna need a bigger rollie paper... :D

    I do have a recipe for cooking a galah (a pestiferously common, raucous and thoroughly annoying native Oz parrot), though.

    You pluck the galah, and meanwhile bring a billy to boil, with a large lump of granite in it. When boiling viciously, add the galah to the water, and boil on high heat for at least 7 hours.

    Drain the water off, throw out the galah, and eat the lump of granite.

    Sorry, seriously, I've no idea how to cook a turkey, but there are indeed some good cooks here, and I bet you get some wonderful replies, unlike my rubbish above. :D
    Aussie Seahawk
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  • Although a consider myself a decent cook and pretty good on the grill, I can’t offer much here.

    I do however know how to make a “turkey float”.
    pmedic920
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  • You put him in water.

    :{)
    pmedic920
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  • 1. Spatchcock the turkey - Cut out the backbone and flatten out the bird. It will cook much quicker and much more evenly.

    2. Dry Brine - 2 days before cooking salt the bird and put on a rack in a sheet pan and put it in the fridge until you are ready to cook. This will allow the salt to penetrate the bird and also help with moisture retention.

    3. Cook at 325-375 - Forget low and slow with poultry. Higher temps will help get a nice, crispy skin while fully cooking the bird without drying it out.

    4. As far as seasoning that is totally up to you. Any poultry rub will do. This rub: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... ste-recipe is great on poultry but any bbq rub without salt (assuming you dry brined) will be good.

    5. Make sure you hit the proper temperatures. 160-165 for the white meat and 175 for the dark.

    Here are a couple blog posts I have written about cooking turkeys: http://completecarnivore.com/3-tips-perfect-turkey/ and http://completecarnivore.com/my-1-tip-f ... ng-turkey/ They don't specifically address smoking turkey but the principles are definitely the same.
    drcool
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  • drcool wrote:1. Spatchcock the turkey - Cut out the backbone and flatten out the bird. It will cook much quicker and much more evenly.

    2. Dry Brine - 2 days before cooking salt the bird and put on a rack in a sheet pan and put it in the fridge until you are ready to cook. This will allow the salt to penetrate the bird and also help with moisture retention.

    3. Cook at 325-375 - Forget low and slow with poultry. Higher temps will help get a nice, crispy skin while fully cooking the bird without drying it out.

    4. As far as seasoning that is totally up to you. Any poultry rub will do. This rub: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... ste-recipe is great on poultry but any bbq rub without salt (assuming you dry brined) will be good.

    5. Make sure you hit the proper temperatures. 160-165 for the white meat and 175 for the dark.

    Here are a couple blog posts I have written about cooking turkeys: http://completecarnivore.com/3-tips-perfect-turkey/ and http://completecarnivore.com/my-1-tip-f ... ng-turkey/ They don't specifically address smoking turkey but the principles are definitely the same.


    This is all pretty good advice. Personally, I go for a wet brine, because it needs less time, but no matter which you choose, a brine of some type is going to make your life smoking a turkey much easier (and more flavorful)
    kidhawk
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  • I've owned several smokers over the years (electric, offset, etc), and now use a pellet grill/smoker (best grill I've ever bought).

    The above advice is how I do it as well, except I don't remove the backbone.

    Brine it at least 24 hours in advance in the fridge. Pat it dry, let it sit out at room temp for about 45 minutes. Lightly oil the bird, and put on whatever rub you choose.

    I smoke it at 225 (heavy smoke for a pellet grill at that temp) for the 1st hour, then crank it up to 350. Doesn't take as long as you'd think to cook it. Check the temps in the breast and thick part of the leg to know when it's done.
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  • You're going to smoke a tukey? My suggestion is go with a lot of lighters and draw down real hard on it. LOL sorry

    Years ago I was reading a field and stream magazine and I came across a recipe for a batch of jerky, it was called "warrior beef jerky" its been my go to brine, and yes I've smoked a turkey with awesome results.

    1 cup red wine (your favorite) Cella Lambrusco is what I use
    1/3 cup lemon juice
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1 teaspoon liquid smoke
    1/4 teaspoon crushed black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon season salt
    3 bay leafs broken into pieces
    1 tablespoon soy sauce
    1 teaspoon worisher sauce
    ***Edit: 1 teaspoon onion powder, 1 clove crushed garlic***
    Good for beef turkey chichen or a old shoe. You mite chose to google it just to make sure I'm right. Warrior beef jerky.

    Soak steaks over nite, turkey let soak three days.
    Cheers
    Last edited by Chawker on Thu Nov 15, 2018 5:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
    Chawker
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  • drcool wrote:1. Spatchcock the turkey - Cut out the backbone and flatten out the bird. It will cook much quicker and much more evenly.

    2. Dry Brine - 2 days before cooking salt the bird and put on a rack in a sheet pan and put it in the fridge until you are ready to cook. This will allow the salt to penetrate the bird and also help with moisture retention.

    3. Cook at 325-375 - Forget low and slow with poultry. Higher temps will help get a nice, crispy skin while fully cooking the bird without drying it out.

    4. As far as seasoning that is totally up to you. Any poultry rub will do. This rub: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... ste-recipe is great on poultry but any bbq rub without salt (assuming you dry brined) will be good.

    5. Make sure you hit the proper temperatures. 160-165 for the white meat and 175 for the dark.

    Here are a couple blog posts I have written about cooking turkeys: http://completecarnivore.com/3-tips-perfect-turkey/ and http://completecarnivore.com/my-1-tip-f ... ng-turkey/ They don't specifically address smoking turkey but the principles are definitely the same.


    Quoting to up vote this. It's how I will do my turkey this year. I've smoked lots of ribs and brisket, but never turkey. This year I bought a propane smoker, previously I'd used a Weber Smokey Mountain. Would get plenty of smoke from the lump charcoal, sometimes too much, which is why I bought the propane smoker. With it, and I assume your electric, the smoke comes from lumps of wood that sit in a cast iron tray just above the heat source. I would advise, on your first smoke to go easy on the chunks of wood. One or two two inch square pieces of say Apple wood, is a good place to start. It's like salt in that if you use too much you can't do anything about it. Less is more to begin with.
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  • kidhawk wrote:
    drcool wrote:1. Spatchcock the turkey - Cut out the backbone and flatten out the bird. It will cook much quicker and much more evenly.

    2. Dry Brine - 2 days before cooking salt the bird and put on a rack in a sheet pan and put it in the fridge until you are ready to cook. This will allow the salt to penetrate the bird and also help with moisture retention.

    3. Cook at 325-375 - Forget low and slow with poultry. Higher temps will help get a nice, crispy skin while fully cooking the bird without drying it out.

    4. As far as seasoning that is totally up to you. Any poultry rub will do. This rub: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... ste-recipe is great on poultry but any bbq rub without salt (assuming you dry brined) will be good.

    5. Make sure you hit the proper temperatures. 160-165 for the white meat and 175 for the dark.

    Here are a couple blog posts I have written about cooking turkeys: http://completecarnivore.com/3-tips-perfect-turkey/ and http://completecarnivore.com/my-1-tip-f ... ng-turkey/ They don't specifically address smoking turkey but the principles are definitely the same.


    This is all pretty good advice. Personally, I go for a wet brine, because it needs less time, but no matter which you choose, a brine of some type is going to make your life smoking a turkey much easier (and more flavorful)


    You are behind the times Kid. Wet brining is dead.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/12/dini ... ining.html
    StoneCold
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  • StoneCold wrote:
    kidhawk wrote:
    drcool wrote:1. Spatchcock the turkey - Cut out the backbone and flatten out the bird. It will cook much quicker and much more evenly.

    2. Dry Brine - 2 days before cooking salt the bird and put on a rack in a sheet pan and put it in the fridge until you are ready to cook. This will allow the salt to penetrate the bird and also help with moisture retention.

    3. Cook at 325-375 - Forget low and slow with poultry. Higher temps will help get a nice, crispy skin while fully cooking the bird without drying it out.

    4. As far as seasoning that is totally up to you. Any poultry rub will do. This rub: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... ste-recipe is great on poultry but any bbq rub without salt (assuming you dry brined) will be good.

    5. Make sure you hit the proper temperatures. 160-165 for the white meat and 175 for the dark.

    Here are a couple blog posts I have written about cooking turkeys: http://completecarnivore.com/3-tips-perfect-turkey/ and http://completecarnivore.com/my-1-tip-f ... ng-turkey/ They don't specifically address smoking turkey but the principles are definitely the same.


    This is all pretty good advice. Personally, I go for a wet brine, because it needs less time, but no matter which you choose, a brine of some type is going to make your life smoking a turkey much easier (and more flavorful)


    You are behind the times Kid. Wet brining is dead.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/12/dini ... ining.html


    Pffft...that article has nothing to do with smoking a turkey. It's much easier to cook in an oven without putting it in a brine first, but I would never smoke a turkey without some type of brine....wet if you're short on time, or dry if you have the time to let it sit a few days.
    kidhawk
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  • kidhawk wrote:
    StoneCold wrote:
    kidhawk wrote:
    drcool wrote:1. Spatchcock the turkey - Cut out the backbone and flatten out the bird. It will cook much quicker and much more evenly.

    2. Dry Brine - 2 days before cooking salt the bird and put on a rack in a sheet pan and put it in the fridge until you are ready to cook. This will allow the salt to penetrate the bird and also help with moisture retention.

    3. Cook at 325-375 - Forget low and slow with poultry. Higher temps will help get a nice, crispy skin while fully cooking the bird without drying it out.

    4. As far as seasoning that is totally up to you. Any poultry rub will do. This rub: https://amazingribs.com/tested-recipes/ ... ste-recipe is great on poultry but any bbq rub without salt (assuming you dry brined) will be good.

    5. Make sure you hit the proper temperatures. 160-165 for the white meat and 175 for the dark.

    Here are a couple blog posts I have written about cooking turkeys: http://completecarnivore.com/3-tips-perfect-turkey/ and http://completecarnivore.com/my-1-tip-f ... ng-turkey/ They don't specifically address smoking turkey but the principles are definitely the same.


    This is all pretty good advice. Personally, I go for a wet brine, because it needs less time, but no matter which you choose, a brine of some type is going to make your life smoking a turkey much easier (and more flavorful)


    You are behind the times Kid. Wet brining is dead.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/12/dini ... ining.html


    Pffft...that article has nothing to do with smoking a turkey. It's much easier to cook in an oven without putting it in a brine first, but I would never smoke a turkey without some type of brine....wet if you're short on time, or dry if you have the time to let it sit a few days.


    Hmm, When I read it it was about the differences between wet and dry brines. The big knock on wet brining is you get a turkey full of salty water, which in turn can result in over salty drippings that can't be used for gravy. Also, some people felt it made the turkey taste like lunch meat. All mileage will vary of course.

    Whether it's wise or not to never smoke with out some kind of brine, I don't know. Heat is heat, no?
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  • StoneCold wrote:
    kidhawk wrote:
    StoneCold wrote:
    kidhawk wrote:
    This is all pretty good advice. Personally, I go for a wet brine, because it needs less time, but no matter which you choose, a brine of some type is going to make your life smoking a turkey much easier (and more flavorful)


    You are behind the times Kid. Wet brining is dead.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/12/dini ... ining.html


    Pffft...that article has nothing to do with smoking a turkey. It's much easier to cook in an oven without putting it in a brine first, but I would never smoke a turkey without some type of brine....wet if you're short on time, or dry if you have the time to let it sit a few days.


    Hmm, When I read it it was about the differences between wet and dry brines. The big knock on wet brining is you get a turkey full of salty water, which in turn can result in over salty drippings that can't be used for gravy. Also, some people felt it made the turkey taste like lunch meat. All mileage will vary of course.

    Whether it's wise or not to never smoke with out some kind of brine, I don't know. Heat is heat, no?


    If you cook a turkey at a lower temperature, it tends to become quite dry without some sort of assistance which brining does. This is why I would never smoke a turkey without some kind of brine. Also, I've never used the drippings from a smoked turkey for making a gravy. I've just never been a fan of gravy with a smoked turkey. The smoked turkey meat is really good on it's own and isn't to dry with the brine, so shouldn't need any gravy.

    I have heard that dry brining is better, but I have yet to try it. I haven't smoked a turkey for several years. I just don't have the time for it nowadays.

    Of course with all this said, it's all about personal preferences, so I always recommend people go with what they think will work best for them and their tastes.

    I will add that I've never had a textural issue with turkey meat when wet brining. Maybe some people use more salt, or brine it too long, I can't say.
    kidhawk
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  • Again, nothing to help but.....


    Even though I love “smoked” meat of all types/varieties, I’ll take a “Deep Fried” Turkey any day over a “smoked” one.

    If you’ve never had a “Cajun” Fried Turkey, you are truly missing out on a culinary delight.


    “Laissez les bond temps rouler”

    ;{)


    Edit:
    Maybe I can help a little.

    If you can get your hands on some “seasoned” (never use green/unseasoned) Mesquite wood, give it a try.

    I’ve grown very fond of the distinct flavor that Mesquite imparts.
    Didn’t care for it the first few times but hot dam it grew on me. Hands down, now it’s my favorite for most meats, works well with many cheeses as well.
    pmedic920
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  • Of the veey few turkeys Ive ever done, spatchcocking was by far the best. It can be a pain chopping out that backbone, but it cooks the skin crispier, cooks the mear quicker and more evenly resulting in far more moist meat (giggity) throughout.
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  • The times I have wet brined a turkey the texture turned out almost ham-like. Wasn't a fan at all. Never had that when dry brining.
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  • pmedic920 wrote:Again, nothing to help but.....


    Even though I love “smoked” meat of all types/varieties, I’ll take a “Deep Fried” Turkey any day over a “smoked” one.

    If you’ve never had a “Cajun” Fried Turkey, you are truly missing out on a culinary delight.


    “Laissez les bond temps rouler”

    ;{)


    Edit:
    Maybe I can help a little.

    If you can get your hands on some “seasoned” (never use green/unseasoned) Mesquite wood, give it a try.

    I’ve grown very fond of the distinct flavor that Mesquite imparts.
    Didn’t care for it the first few times but hot dam it grew on me. Hands down, now it’s my favorite for most meats, works well with many cheeses as well.



    When I was in Guam, I went to a location on Saturdays for a pool tournament that they had every week. Of the 10 to 12 times I was there, we had deep fried turkey about every 3rd weekend. I never had done it. THey said here is how, Do It. So I did. It was so easy. And the meat was fabulous.

    One of the lads brought in a couple of Mahi Mahi that he had caught the one day for the dinner. No one had filleted them before, So I did that too. I have a pic somewhere. Just some memories with some Navy gentlemen.
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  • drcool wrote:The times I have wet brined a turkey the texture turned out almost ham-like. Wasn't a fan at all. Never had that when dry brining.


    That’s interesting. I’m not a fan of ham, especially the texture. It’s fine as a thin sliced sandwich meat but just not to slice off a chunk to eat. I’ve never had that with my turkey. I am careful to brime it for less than 10 hours though. I wonder if that’s the difference????

    Maybe over the summer I’ll try to dry brine one and smoke it and see how it comes out.
    kidhawk
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  • This recipe is one that I came across in one of my cook books. Its a real recipe.

    Elephant stew

    Take one medium-sized elephant and cut him up in 1 inch cubes or bite size pieces,this should take you at least two day to get it done. Place in a real large kettle and cook at 675 degrees 8 to 10 hours then add 50 lbs of potatos 25lbs onions and 5lbs of carrots cook for another two hours. One whole rabbit is optional, because not everybody like hair in there stew.

    Cheers
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  • The_Z_Man wrote:Thanks for the tips, everyone.

    PMedic -- I have some mesquite, some hickory, some cherry wood, apple wood, and some whiskey soaked chips.

    I'm doing a trial turkey on Monday -- making the brine tonight. Going to make that one hickory.

    For thanksgiving I'm going applewood.



    Be sure to post results I’m sure we would all like to hear how you do it and how it turned out. Pictures never hurt either
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  • Thanks for the update Z-man. Remember smoking meat is a art and you are the artist!
    Cheers and have a happy thanksgiving
    Chawker
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  • Bird

    Only issue was uneven browning, easily solved by rotating the bird. Next time.

    I have to say I love this propane smoker. It's so easy to use.
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    StoneCold
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  • StoneCold wrote:Bird

    Only issue was uneven browning, easily solved by rotating the bird. Next time.

    I have to say I love this propane smoker. It's so easy to use.


    Not sure if you want to try it, but I think if you put the roasting pan on a rack beneath the bird and place the bird directly on the rack above the pan you'd get a more equal browning overall. Might be worth a try. When I smoke, I rarely use a pan for anything other than catching drippings to make for easier cleaning. I find that it comes out better for me if I smoke directly on the racks.

    I will say that bird looks pretty good though. Making me want turkey again :2thumbs:
    kidhawk
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  • kidhawk wrote:
    StoneCold wrote:Bird

    Only issue was uneven browning, easily solved by rotating the bird. Next time.

    I have to say I love this propane smoker. It's so easy to use.


    Not sure if you want to try it, but I think if you put the roasting pan on a rack beneath the bird and place the bird directly on the rack above the pan you'd get a more equal browning overall. Might be worth a try. When I smoke, I rarely use a pan for anything other than catching drippings to make for easier cleaning. I find that it comes out better for me if I smoke directly on the racks.

    I will say that bird looks pretty good though. Making me want turkey again :2thumbs:


    That might also work. I did it in the pan to reduce clean up. The part that has more browning was in the back away from the door, so it may still need to be turned.

    I think the pan also may reduce the amount of smoke that gets in. I could go for a bit more smoke. I used one chunk of apple, 3x2x2 inches. Will try adding another chunk next time. When? Not sure. One 10 lb turkey goes a long ways for two people. In addition to just having a turkey dinner I've made a batch of soup and a baked pasta dish I'll call Turkey Crackazinni. If Crack was food this is what it would taste like. So that makes 3 turkey based dinners 2 lunches and will have turkey tonight and tomorrow for lunch and then at least one more dinner after that. That's a lot of turkey. I do like turkey, will need a good long break. Maybe for Christmas. :D
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  • Hmm.....got me thinking about a smoker I may make now. A neighbor has a broken water pressure tank. I just have to get here to my home. About a half mile ride on my quad and a trailer due to location. I may make it into a smoker with electric or gas. I have tools and equipment to do experimentation and a wisdom to play with it. I thank my dad for that. I think it will be fun. I do have one smoker but it is small and I dont like the way it is set up by racks that you have to pull out off the top.
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  • The_Z_Man wrote:
    StoneCold wrote:
    kidhawk wrote:
    StoneCold wrote:Bird

    Only issue was uneven browning, easily solved by rotating the bird. Next time.

    I have to say I love this propane smoker. It's so easy to use.


    Not sure if you want to try it, but I think if you put the roasting pan on a rack beneath the bird and place the bird directly on the rack above the pan you'd get a more equal browning overall. Might be worth a try. When I smoke, I rarely use a pan for anything other than catching drippings to make for easier cleaning. I find that it comes out better for me if I smoke directly on the racks.

    I will say that bird looks pretty good though. Making me want turkey again :2thumbs:


    That might also work. I did it in the pan to reduce clean up. The part that has more browning was in the back away from the door, so it may still need to be turned.

    I think the pan also may reduce the amount of smoke that gets in. I could go for a bit more smoke. I used one chunk of apple, 3x2x2 inches. Will try adding another chunk next time. When? Not sure. One 10 lb turkey goes a long ways for two people. In addition to just having a turkey dinner I've made a batch of soup and a baked pasta dish I'll call Turkey Crackazinni. If Crack was food this is what it would taste like. So that makes 3 turkey based dinners 2 lunches and will have turkey tonight and tomorrow for lunch and then at least one more dinner after that. That's a lot of turkey. I do like turkey, will need a good long break. Maybe for Christmas. :D



    How did you like the flavor of the soup? Interesting was it not?

    I did the same -- boiled the bones of my test and T day turkeys to make the bone broth. Sliced up 2 onions, 8 stalks of celery, shredded 6 carrots - browned those up, a touch of garlic and some fresh thyme, and, simmered all that in the broth and leftover turkey meat for 2 hours and pow! Smoked Turkey Soup. Easy and cheap lunch for a week or so for both of us.


    Yes! I t was delicious. Made some stock in the Instant Pot that came out really good. We just finished the last of the Turkey Tetrazinni last night. Still have a serving or two of the soup, but honestly I'm burnt out on Turkey. That is one big bird. :irishdrinkers:
    StoneCold
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  • StoneCold wrote:Yes! I t was delicious. Made some stock in the Instant Pot that came out really good. We just finished the last of the Turkey Tetrazinni last night. Still have a serving or two of the soup, but honestly I'm burnt out on Turkey. That is one big bird. :irishdrinkers:


    You need to get an Andean condor, and a California condor, and compare them! :)
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  • Chawker wrote:You're going to smoke a tukey? My suggestion is go with a lot of lighters and draw down real hard on it. LOL sorry

    Years ago I was reading a field and stream magazine and I came across a recipe for a batch of jerky, it was called "warrior beef jerky" its been my go to brine, and yes I've smoked a turkey with awesome results.

    1 cup red wine (your favorite) Cella Lambrusco is what I use
    1/3 cup lemon juice
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1 teaspoon liquid smoke
    1/4 teaspoon crushed black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon season salt
    2 bay leafs broken into pieces
    1 tablespoon soy sauce
    1 teaspoon worisher sauce
    ***Edit: 1 teaspoon onion powder, 1 clove crushed garlic***
    Good for beef turkey chichen or a old shoe. You mite chose to google it just to make sure I'm right. Warrior beef jerky.

    Soak steaks over nite, turkey let soak three days.
    Cheers



    This brine recipe I started out making some beef jerky which turned out reel good, but after soaking the stripes of beef in it I didn't want to just toss it out, so I threw in a new york strip steak in it and let it soak over nite. The next day I pulled the steak out of the brine and patted it dry and let it sit out to air dry for about 1 hour and grilled it up on the bbq. I grilled it up to where it was lightly pink on the inside. I took one bite and i knew i was on to something real special, But I thought I needed a expect opinion on it. My dad was a spokesman for the seven western states for the Aberdeen Angus association in his young years. He try it and I was sent to the store for more steaks for the next day. Its one dam fine steak that I'd put up against any other steak. Medium rare is the best. About 7 minutes a side. Let the steak rest for 3 to 5 minutes. Its out of this worldly good.
    ** EDIT 2bay leaves**

    Cheers
    Chawker
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  • I'd say after selecting the beef type, make sure your beef is aged properly, a 3 to 4 week hanging time is what I'd shoot for, that is if you want that high quality flavor. Dry aging is a true science, but it will bring out a truly wonderful favors in your beef.

    I still think a quality corn fed angus steak is the best steak in the world. :179417:
    Chawker
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  • As far as jerky goes, the best jerky I've ever made was a recipe I figured out on the fly as I went through a few batches. It's startlingly quick and easy.

    Take a frozen cut of beef steak--I found a grainier, brisket-like cut was best--and slice it into as thin of slices as you can. Try for about an eighth of an inch or so. Cut width-wise on the steak for shorter pieces, as they'll tend to fall apart.

    Add a packet (or two, depending on the amount you're making, and yes, I like to wing it according to taste) of season mixes such as hickory smoke, barbecue, Montreal steak, teriyaki, or even some of the more unusual ones like Chinese duck (okay) or Korean barbecue (actually delicious). Rub the dry mixes in well until all the pieces are soaked, stained, and soft. Lay them out in a single layer on your dryer or smoker, and dry them until they're crispy. You can get them extremely close to bacon in consistency (and even flavor) that way. The less lean your cut is (unless it's very marbled), the more it turns out like bacon.

    Purists might think it's cheating a bit to use packets of ready-mixed rub, but it's fantastic stuff that disappears like Halloween candy during kindergarten recess.

    Image

    Image
    Seahawk Sailor
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  • Hey, its cheese season! Its that time of year, so bring out your gouda and your chedders, and light'em up!
    Chawker
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  • Its BBQ season!!! So whats on your grill? Roasted porchetta ? Maybe making your own smoked bacon, maybe chicken or some smoked plate ribs.

    Don't forget the side dishes, coleslaw, baked beans and watermelon. Hungry yet? :drool:

    Cheers
    Last edited by Chawker on Sun Jun 02, 2019 1:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Chawker
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  • Have you tried looking on youtube? They usually have something that can be helpful.

    I'd start with 3 habaneros cut out the seeds with 1/2 mango add 1/4 cup water in a blender and mix, if its sweet add some brown sugar or teriyaki sauce. Soak over night. :drool: But I'd try youtube first. Good luck bud.
    Cheers
    Chawker
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  • I make and sell the best Smoked Beef Jerky on the planet. I sell out in the 2 markets we attend every week selling over 70 bags at each one, plus at the Southern Star Brewery.

    I don't use any of that artificial packaged spice shit. I use all fresh ingredients, and I ONLY use grass fed eye of round cut against the grain in 1/4 inch pieces. All my batches are marinated a minimum of 3 days. Then slow smoked using mostly mesquite and hickory.

    Edit:by staff.
    Contact ownership if you want to post links to your personal business.
    Thanks.
    Largent80
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  • I checked youtube and they do have it! Seach habanero mango jerky and BOOM Archer's.
    Cheers
    Chawker
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  • I know nothing about jerky, except that I like it and it's also expensive. I know something like 60% of it disappears because of the water content, but is there such a thing as low-grade jerky that still tastes decent, made with cheap meat? Every jerky I find anywhere, is like bare minimum $15/lb, usually more.
    RolandDeschain
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  • RolandDeschain wrote:I know nothing about jerky, except that I like it and it's also expensive. I know something like 60% of it disappears because of the water content, but is there such a thing as low-grade jerky that still tastes decent, made with cheap meat? Every jerky I find anywhere, is like bare minimum $15/lb, usually more.


    So you like your Jerky like your Hookers, Cheap and Low Grade.
    chris98251
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  • The meat I use for my jerky is at wholesale cost of $4.79 per pound. Out of 5 pounds yields 20-22 bags (2 oz each). I sell them for $5 a bag. It's not the dried out crap they sell almost everywhere.
    Largent80
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  • Chawker wrote:
    Chawker wrote:You're going to smoke a tukey? My suggestion is go with a lot of lighters and draw down real hard on it. LOL sorry

    Years ago I was reading a field and stream magazine and I came across a recipe for a batch of jerky, it was called "warrior beef jerky" its been my go to brine, and yes I've smoked a turkey with awesome results.

    1 cup red wine (your favorite) Cella Lambrusco is what I use
    1/3 cup lemon juice
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    1 teaspoon liquid smoke
    1/4 teaspoon crushed black pepper
    1/2 teaspoon season salt
    2 bay leafs broken into pieces
    1 tablespoon soy sauce
    1 teaspoon worisher sauce
    ***Edit: 1 teaspoon onion powder, 1 clove crushed garlic***
    Good for beef turkey chichen or a old shoe. You mite chose to google it just to make sure I'm right. Warrior beef jerky.

    Soak steaks over nite, turkey let soak three days.
    Cheers



    This brine recipe I started out making some beef jerky which turned out reel good, but after soaking the stripes of beef in it I didn't want to just toss it out, so I threw in a new york strip steak in it and let it soak over nite. The next day I pulled the steak out of the brine and patted it dry and let it sit out to air dry for about 1 hour and grilled it up on the bbq. I grilled it up to where it was lightly pink on the inside. I took one bite and i knew i was on to something real special, But I thought I needed a expect opinion on it. My dad was a spokesman for the seven western states for the Aberdeen Angus association in his young years. He try it and I was sent to the store for more steaks for the next day. Its one dam fine steak that I'd put up against any other steak. Medium rare is the best. About 7 minutes a side. Let the steak rest for 3 to 5 minutes. Its out of this worldly good.
    ** EDIT 2bay leaves**

    Cheers


    Best jerky recipe EVER!!! :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l: :0190l:
    Chawker
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  • The original Warriors mark beef jerky. From field and stream magazine. Dec. 1981

    3/4 cup dry red wine
    1/3 cup lemon juice
    1/4 cup miced ouion
    1/4 cup brown sugar
    2 tsp. Liquid smoke
    1 tbsp. Season salt
    1/4 tsp. Black pepper
    3 bay leafs broken into pieces

    Combine and soak meat overnight.

    Cheers
    Chawker
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  • The oldest jerky recipe was just two ingredients, water and salt. Preserving food use to be a little more important then it is today. Today its all about the bold flavor, but once in a while it good to return to the basics.

    You can buy a round roast and ask your butcher to slice it thin, your personal thickness will come from trial and error, different thickness may vary from recipe to recipe. One tip: go as lean as possible, trimming the fat is so important if you are going to freeze your jerky.

    You can slice jerky basically two ways, with the grain for a tough chew or against the grain for a little bit easier chew.

    One ingredient I use in my home made BBQ sauce is a can of A&W rootbeer, reducing it first, but for jerky I'm not so sure if it would work.
    Cheers
    Chawker
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  • I would never give my recipes up, but just to say, I would never follow a recipe for making jerky or any other thing smoked. It's trial and error.

    Cut of beef, pork, chicken or fish is the most important thing. Your end result is only as good as what you start with. Your particular smoker is also part of it. I'm a successful businessman because of a lot of trial and error.

    I've been told to not include links to my products here. So what?...I don't need to promote my stuff here.

    I sell out every week.
    Largent80
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  • June the 12th is national Jerky day.

    I understand not wanting to share your recipe with anybody Largent80, its your livelihood. But you have alot of other tips and tricks you do share. You say by trail and error, at least you know what won't work in a recipe. LOL

    I'm wanting to try a fireball whisky recipe? Maybe O.J.,pineapple, cherry juice with a 1 habanero pepper? Sounds weird but you've got to remember who you're dealing with. Right!

    :greetingsearthling:
    Last edited by Chawker on Thu Jun 06, 2019 10:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
    Chawker
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  • Largent80 wrote:Cut of beef, pork, chicken or fish is the most important thing. Your end result is only as good as what you start with.

    You should watch Hell's Kitchen to see how wrong this statement is. The parts where Gordon Ramsay un-thaws microwave TV dinners and gas station fare and remakes them into things that fool the contestants into thinking they're good are particularly riveting. :)

    You can already read about The Judgment of Paris, where that very same thing is proven with wine: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judgment_of_Paris_(wine)
    RolandDeschain
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  • I use to work for a family out in George who made there own smoked sausage, I'm talk'in a steer and pig from the hoof to cut, mixed,stuffed, smoked and wrapped. About 800lbs of sausage and boy was it good. I never got the recipe, but I can get close to it.

    Well, seeing how Wednesday is national jerky day I'm working on a new jerky recipe. Its going to be a complicated recipe, I odered some spice from Iowa and Las Vegas today and I plan on getting the rest later this week. ( although the Vegas order, they were out and its going to be 7 to 10 day until they make a new batch) I'm at 25 ingredients and counting. I'm shooting for spicy and sweet but retain the beef flavor. ;)
    Chawker
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  • I sort of have a holy trinity of Garlic Salt, Black Pepper, and Smoked Paprika on almost anything. It's even really good on salmon, steelhead, and halibut filets skin on and skin down on the grill. Just throw your squeezed lemon juice and garnish on afterwards or whatever so that it cooks in it's own fats and still gets a fresh flavor with it. The trinity can be left alone, such as on steaks, or can just be a base for other flavors.

    Edit: holy shit if you put honey or brown sugar and bourbon reduction drizzle on that fish with the citrus... doesn't even matter if you were to smoke with those flavors.
    vin.couve12
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  • I know that the "holy trinity" for beef is salt, pepper and garlic.
    Chawker
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  • Salt, pepper and garlic on any beef and it will be good. Steak, burger or ribs.

    Try this: 1 quart of water
    1 tsp salt
    1 tsp garlic powder
    1/2 tsp pepper

    Now to add more beef flavor try a bouillon cube or a tsp of au jus and mix well. Soak beef 24 hours in brine, remove blot dry with papper towel and smoke. :drool:
    Cheers
    Chawker
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  • I just got a new smoker the other day, my little chief is goneskied (I gave it to my step grandson, hes 12 years old)

    I got a good deal on a Dyna glo charcoal offset vertical smoker, 250 dollars with a cover. Its the wide body that has six racks that holds up to 150 lbs of meat. I haven't broken it in yet, but looks like it will do the trick for me.

    I'm wanting to get 4 big slabs of pork belly cut them down into 3 pieces, which would be 12 slabs of bacon. Plus, I'll have to try out the rib rack and last I'm going to throw in some ox tails. :drool:
    Chawker
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