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Why Are Container/Cargo Ships Lined Up off Los Angeles/Long

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  • Why Are Container/Cargo Ships Lined Up off Los Angeles/Long Beach? | What's Going on With Shipping? >>>
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    Jville
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  • They aren’t paying folks enough to offload them would be my guess.
    Sports Hernia
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  • I think it’s all of our major ports, not only in Cali.

    Is there not a back up in Seattle?
    pmedic920
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  • pmedic920 wrote:I think it’s all of our major ports, not only in Cali.

    Is there not a back up in Seattle?


    Tacoma is the (more) major port facility, and yes, they're backed up as well.

    Our federal regime is the source of the delays. Specifically why remains to be seen, but it may have something to do with escalating military tensions with China. You can't rule out their utter and obvious incompetence or malfeasance, either. Whatever the case, the federal government is the source of the problem.
    SmokinHawk
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  • It’s a multiple of reasons. Money for longshore is not one of them. The waterfront is afflicted with the same problem many industries are facing. Experienced workers are burnt out and new and old are realizing that grinding 70-100 hour weeks is not worth it.

    As far as the ports, its a combination of cargo volumes exploding with the introduction of the world’s biggest cargo vessels and individual ports not having the financial ability to continue upgrading their infrastructure. In Tacoma they have made massive investments in several terminals only to be at max capacity at opening. Money and time for further expansion is in short supply. Top that off with a rail system that has been operating at above capacity for many years and Rail conglomerates that refuse to invest their own money in the needed upgrades and manning increases.

    The supply chain has been playing a dangerous game of on time deliveries that never took into account the insane increase in demand from a locked down country. 20 years ago one of our port commissioners shared a study that predicted steady increase in container volume for the next 50 years. In other words they knew it was coming and still kicked the can down the road.
    That doesn’t even include lack of truck drivers and highway congestion. Port truckers include some of the lowest paid in the industry with abysmal terminal turn times. Many companies won’t operate at night or swing due to overtime and driver hour requirements.

    Even with full compliments of workers operating at peak performance there is only a finite number of containers that can be moved in a day. The whole system is failing.
    If you want a good look at the problem check out the MarineTraffic App, its not free but if you get it first look at LA/Longbeach and the area around it….then scroll over to the China Sea. Literally thousands of vessels at anchor.

    Companies like Target and Amazon are chartering their own vessels in an attempt to get their product. Hundreds of vessels have been recommissioned to be used as floating warehouses.

    I have never seen anything like it in my 35 years, and I don’t see any way to climb out.
    Flyingsquad23
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  • Flyingsquad23 wrote:It’s a multiple of reasons. Money for longshore is not one of them. The waterfront is afflicted with the same problem many industries are facing. Experienced workers are burnt out and new and old are realizing that grinding 70-100 hour weeks is not worth it.

    As far as the ports, its a combination of cargo volumes exploding with the introduction of the world’s biggest cargo vessels and individual ports not having the financial ability to continue upgrading their infrastructure. In Tacoma they have made massive investments in several terminals only to be at max capacity at opening. Money and time for further expansion is in short supply. Top that off with a rail system that has been operating at above capacity for many years and Rail conglomerates that refuse to invest their own money in the needed upgrades and manning increases.

    The supply chain has been playing a dangerous game of on time deliveries that never took into account the insane increase in demand from a locked down country. 20 years ago one of our port commissioners shared a study that predicted steady increase in container volume for the next 50 years. In other words they knew it was coming and still kicked the can down the road.
    That doesn’t even include lack of truck drivers and highway congestion. Port truckers include some of the lowest paid in the industry with abysmal terminal turn times. Many companies won’t operate at night or swing due to overtime and driver hour requirements.

    Even with full compliments of workers operating at peak performance there is only a finite number of containers that can be moved in a day. The whole system is failing.
    If you want a good look at the problem check out the MarineTraffic App, its not free but if you get it first look at LA/Longbeach and the area around it….then scroll over to the China Sea. Literally thousands of vessels at anchor.

    Companies like Target and Amazon are chartering their own vessels in an attempt to get their product. Hundreds of vessels have been recommissioned to be used as floating warehouses.

    I have never seen anything like it in my 35 years, and I don’t see any way to climb out.



    Confined to current practices, I don't think there is any way out. An overly simplified graft for companies, and the industries they make up, is sometimes represented by ......

    Image

    ........ today's massively scaled global output from our inherited and evolved social economical systems has already moved to the right of Q1 ... the point of least cost. The global port situation, along with all the floating bits of plastics in global waters surrounding cargo ships, is yet another, in a large and growing collection of warnings, of what is to come.

    It's obvious that multiple Diseconomies of Scale have arrived in mass.
    Jville
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  • Who would have ever guessed that lockdown was a bad idea?
    SmokinHawk
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